TVAES

 


Being Imperial : Egypt and the Levant at home and abroad in the New Kingdom

 

 

 

 

Saturday 15 October 2016
2.00 pm
Venue Oakwood Centre

 

Abstract

Public Lecture:
By Dr Linda Hulin


Dr Linda HulinThis lecture explores the social impact of the Egyptian empire upon Egyptians during the New Kingdom, when Egypt commanded an empire that stretched from modern Lebanon to the Sudan. Previous studies have concerned themselves with narratives of domination and military rule, political relations and the economic impact of the Egyptian presence. Social relations have been framed in terms of the extent to which local elites emulated Egyptian practice; this lecture concentrates upon the impact of the ruled upon the rulers, and argues for a complex set of responses depending upon social position and opportunity.

In all imperial/colonial encounters a line is drawn between "cultural integrity" and "going native", a line that shifts as empires develop, and this process of acceptance and rejection is apparent in Egyptian society. The type of objects and practices that were adopted, adapted or rejected by Egyptians both at home and on service abroad reveals much about their conception of themselves and of the world around them, and brings us to a more nuanced and varied picture than is revealed by either ancient propaganda or modern studies of imported items in Egypt or Egyptian objects in Nubia and the Levant.

Linda Hulin studied for her first degree at the University of Oxford. After two decades working abroad in the field of academic publishing she returned to the UK and read for a PhD at the University of Reading in 2006. From 2006-2009 she was the G.A. Wainwright Fellow in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Oxford, before taking up her current position in the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology.  Linda teaches archaeological theory, world archaeology, and themes in urbanisation and the state, and landscape archaeology.  Her research interests centre upon the eastern Mediterranean in the second and first millennia BC: the archaeology of Cyprus, the Levant, Egypt and Libya with a focus upon cross-cultural encounters: sailors' lives on land across the eastern Mediterranean, and social relationships in imperial contents in New Kingdom Egypt.

 

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